Monthly Archives: April 2014

The Look Book: Creating Your Own Disney Look

When you’re offered a job in a Disney park or resort, you’re not only signing a contract to show up to work; you’re also signing a contract to adhere to the Disney Look. The Disney Look is a compilation of the company’s dress guidelines so that all cast members maintain a clean, classic appearance.

When you’re working in the parks and resorts, you are given your costume, so you don’t have to worry about putting a Disney Look outfit together on a day-to-day basis (unless you have a non-costumed role). Even though you don’t have to worry about your clothes, you do have to worry about your appearance in general. Here are a few of the most common Disney Look rules in terms of general appearance.

  • You can’t have any visible tattoos.
  • Ladies, only one piercing per ear. Guys, no piercings allowed.
  • Glasses and sunglasses have to be a conservative color and style without any logos.
  • No wacky hair colors or styles. Classic only!
  • Guys, if you choose to have facial hair, beards and mustaches must by fully grown and look neat. But no Duck Dynasty beards! Facial hair can’t be more than quarter of an inch long.
  • Ladies, makeup has to be neutral and conservative. Also, nails have to be short and neutral-colored.

At your Disney orientation – Traditions – or any other Disney professional workshop that allows you to ditch your costume for the day, you’ll have to abide be the above rules and more. Disney College Program participants, this means you if you take any classes; you’re required to dress in Disney Look when you go to class.

When it comes to Disney Look clothing, ask yourself this question: Would I wear this article of clothing to a job interview? If the answer is no, you probably shouldn’t wear it. Now we’ll explore the next set Disney Look rules for company-approved clothing.

  • Always have a blazer or sports coat at the ready; some jobs require them on occasion, but they’re always acceptable.
  • No sandals, no exceptions.
  • Khakis are okay as long as they’re ironed.
  • Polo shirts are a no-no.
  • Ladies, you can wear sleeveless dresses or tops as long as the straps are at least 3 inches wide.
  • Skirts and dresses can’t be any shorter than three inches above the knee.
  • Got a thing for paisley? Leave it at home. Patterns can’t have any large graphics or logos.

Now that you’ve read the rules, I have some unsolicited advice for you: Don’t let the Disney Look bust your chops. Yes, the rules seem restrictive, but there’s actually a lot of leeway if you’re willing to get creative. Show your style with your clothing. Ever heard of DisneyBound? It’s when you dress up like a Disney character using every-day clothes. Here are two of my favorite Disney Look-appropriate DisneyBounds (sans hat in the second Bound).

Photo courtesy of outrageousdoughnutlevy.tumblr.com

Mary Poppins DisneyBound courtesy of outrageousdoughnutlevy.tumblr.com

Photo courtesy of Duy at cafeduy.tumblr.com

Aladdin DisneyBound courtesy of cafeduy.tumblr.com

For more information about the Disney Look, visit the Disney College Program’s Disney Look guidelines for males and females. If you’re still struggling and looking for ideas, visit the Disney Internships and Programs official blog to see some outfit examples. (Shout out to Jesi, one of my DCP roommates who is in the photo at the top! She’s the young lady in tan. Read Jesi’s blog about her adventures as a communication student.)

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Application Tips for Disney Professional Internships

As some of you may know, I participated in the Disney College Program (DCP) last spring. There’s one question I always heard from friends, professors and advisors because of it: Why? Why would I want to take a semester off from school to work as a front-line employee at a Disney resort? What was that going to do for my future?

The DCP is only one half of Disney’s programs for college students, and I participated in the DCP so that I would have a better chance of participating in the second half: Disney Professional Internships (PIs). PIs allow college students or recent college graduates to work in their career fields with The Walt Disney Company. For example, as a public relations major, I could work in PR at Disneyland through the PI program.

I recently applied for two different PIs: publicity with Disney Theatrical Group in New York and field marketing and publicity with Disney Studios in California. At this point, I’m still in consideration for both internships, so fingers crossed!

I joined a group of PI hopefuls on Facebook, and that’s where I met Rebecca Muck, a costume design major at Columbia College Chicago. She applied for a few costuming PIs at Disney, and she’s going through the interview process now. This past weekend, I met up with Rebecca on Google Hangout to talk about things we wish we would have known before applying and while we were applying for PIs. Watch the video below to learn some of our tips and tricks for the application and interview process!

If you’re looking for some more PI advice, search through the official Disney Internships and Programs blog; they have a great post on application anxiety that I read through at least once a week to calm my nerves!